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Best Cordless Drill For The Money  
Everything You Need to Know to Get a Great Cordless Drill at a Great Price
Top Five for the Money (Based on our Frugal5 Formula)
How do we pick these products? We spend many hours doing unbiased research to only give you the highest rated products at the best price. We first come up with a list of features, which you can see below, that we feel the majority of people will need. We then look for the highest quality products with these features and only show you the top five with the best value. Our mission is to provide you with the best five options based only on the facts. Don't see the product you were thinking about getting? Click here to calculate it's frugal score.
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Product
Hitachi 2-Speed DS10DFL, 12-Volt PeakSKIL 2415-01 12-Volt Max 3/8-Inch Variable SpeedBlack & Decker LDX112C 12-Volt Max Lithium-IonGenesis GCD18BK 18vKawasaki 840110 Black 19.2-Volt Kit
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Product Rating
 
 
 
 
 
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Good
 
 
 
 
 
Good
 
 
 
 
 
Good
 
 
 
 
 
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Average Price
 
 
 
 
 
Cheap ($40)
 
 
 
 
 
Cheap ($49)
 
 
 
 
 
Cheap ($50)
 
 
 
 
 
Cheap ($32)
 
 
 
 
 
Cheap ($50)
Frugal5 Score
Details
9.0
8.6
8.6
8.6
8.4
Features Needed
Between 12 and 20 Volts
- 12 volts
- 12 volts
- 12 volts
- 18 volts
- 19.2 volts
Compact Design
Keyless Chuck
Low Weight
- 2.2 pounds
- 2 pounds
- 1 pound
- 3.4 pounds
- Total weight for kit: 9.8 pounds
Reverse Switch
Features Not Needed
Built In Bubble Level
Included Bits
- 7 piece set
- 1 double ended bit
- 1 double ended bit
- 7 piece set
- 15 bit set
Storage Case
Work Light
- LED
- LED
What You Need To Know In 5 Minutes

A decent cordless drill is an indispensible part of any DIYer’s tool collection. It’s invaluable for all kinds of tasks that involve drilling holes, obviously, and tightening or loosening screws such as hanging pictures, securing towel racks, or building birdhouses. As such, they’re a worthwhile investment.  

So, what types of things should you look for when in the market for a cordless drill? 

Low Weight

Hand fatigue is a huge concern. Have you ever hefted a display drill or power tool at the store and thought, man, this is heavy; it must be high quality? I know I have. Now, think about what it would be like to hold that heavy drill in your hand, with your arm extended, for long periods of time. Doesn’t sound too pleasant, does it? Drilling is a very repetitive task. You can expect your arm to get tired fairly quickly, so comfort is paramount when it comes to cordless drills. To me, that means that low weight and a compact design is a necessity.

Between 12 and 20 Volts

Cordless drill power is measured in volts. When you think of voltage, the higher the number, the greater the power (and by extension, weight, because the battery gets bigger). For the average, everyday home DIYer, the best voltage range is between 12 and 20. This range offers just the right amount of power, while keeping the drill as light as possible, to get through pretty much any task you can think of. Any lower than that, and your drill may struggle to complete some tasks. Any higher than that, and you’re paying for extra power you really don’t need.   

Keyless Chuck

On drills, the part that holds the bit in place is called the chuck. These come in three different jaw sizes: ¼, 3/8, and ½ inch, however, almost every cordless drill I’ve ever come across has a 3/8 inch chuck, so I wouldn’t worry about the size too much. What you should worry about is whether or not it’s a keyless chuck, which basically means whether you need a key to tighten or loosen bits, or whether you can do it by hand. Obviously, tightening by hand is a lot better, and way more convenient.   

Reversible

The final thing that you should keep in mind when it comes to cordless drills is whether or not they’re reversible. If you plan on using your tool to both drill holes and secure/loosen fasteners, then the ability to reverse is an absolute must. Additionally, drills should be like an extension of your hand when in use. As such, the reversing switch should be very near the trigger. This ensures that you can switch directions on the fly with no more than a finger movement. Any other location is too awkward to be practical. 

So what are some features in cordless drills that can be handy, but ultimately overlooked as not necessary? 

Storage Case

A storage case will help protect your drill when you're storing it, but it isn't necessary. You could always hang the drill on a pegboard, or store it in your toolbox.

Included Bits

When bits come with a drill, it's a nice bonus. However, you might already have a set of bits in your tool collection that will work with your drill. So, included bits are by no means a must have. 

Built in Bubble Level

A built in bubble level on your drill is handy, because it will help you to see if your drilling a straight hole. You can get away without it though. It's more of a convenience thing. 

Work Light

A work light will help illuminate hard to see areas where you're drilling, but like the bubble level, it's more of a convenience thing rather than a necessity.

Additionally, you should keep in mind that while things like included bits and a storage case are not necessary, it is great to buy a set that includes them to avoid having to buy extra things. Additionally, variable speed is kind of a given when it comes to cordless drills because of how necessary and convenient it is to complete most tasks with it. So, if you come across a cordless drill that does not offer this, I don’t care how cheap it is, avoid it with a long pole. 

When it comes to great quality, budget minded drills, Black & Decker, Hitachi, and Skil are king. Brand names like DeWalt, Milwaukee, Bosch, and Makita should be avoided, not because they make bad quality drills or anything (they’re actually very good tools), but because they’re top brand names and as such, you’re going to pay a premium for their product. 

All in all, buying a cordless drill on a budget isn’t hard. Just remember the key, necessary features, keep your price range in mind, and before long you’ll have a great tool for not a lot of money. 

Features You Need
Between 12 and 20 Volts, Compact Design, Keyless Chuck, Low Weight, Reverse Switch
Features You Don't Need
Built In Bubble Level, Included Bits, Storage Case, Work Light
What You Should Pay
Between $31.86 - $49.99
Top Of The Line Price
Over $400.00